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Discussion Starter #1
so....

what are the requisite tools that you need when rebuilding a bike.

before we go any further, i'll add the obligatory joke containing some barely titter worthy joke about reproductive organs. or maybe i wont, you sick man-child, go back to your corner and continue smearing feces everywhere.

what kind of stuff do you keep in your stable of tools?

personally i have a flat-head screwdriver that i snapped the tip in half on, so i figure i effectively have two tools for the price of one.

The reason i ask is because i'm going to be rebuilding my baby blade after it has languished in the recesses of my shed for an embarrassingly long period of time.
 

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You need a decent set of sockets... probably 1/2"
A set of allen head sockets would be a good idea.
A set of metric allen keys
A mallet of some kind.
A set of screw drivers
Some decent pliers and side cutters

I can't think of anything else off the top of my head.

The rear wheel nut is a large socket, probably not part of a socket set unless you buy a very extensive one.
 

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How much do you want to spend and how much work do you want to do on the bike?
 

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I think this has been pretty comprehensively discussed in another thread, but CBF'd finding it
 

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Discussion Starter #6
true, but if people give useful info, then i'll make a new technical thread out of the distilled wisdom of the masses. yes, i realise the irony.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
aaaaaaaaand right on cue.

that one was a give-away. next cunt to use it get stabbed.

mwa :heart:
 

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So... can you please tell us how much you want to spend? Or are you just going to threaten death to people who joke in the thread?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
mikey knows i was joking...

it's less about how much i want to spend than about having the right tools for the job.

like, what size torque wrench (what range, so to speak) is appropriate?
feeler gauges are a must, yes?
 

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If you are doing a full engine re-build a torque wrench will be needed. If you're just cleaning / balancing carbies you can probably get away with it.

Tools are like cars, you can buy a 2nd hand beater which will do the job, but people who have spent 10x as much on there's will look down on you. At the end of the day a cheap tool is cheap to replace and you will still end up investing less than going out and buying snap-on.
 

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Right, well, if you want something like what I've got for the house it will do most jobs pretty well then I can recommend;

Kincrome metric only toolbox, has enough spanners,sockets, breaker bars and other goodies in it to do most jobs.
A deadblow hammer
Vernier
Micrometer
1/2 inch torque wrench beam type
1/4 inch torque wrench beam type
Small cordless impact driver
Fein Multimaster with a few metal blades (much more useful than a hacksaw)
A corded or cordless power drill
Assorted emry paper
A few different versions of loctite
A few different types of tape (duct tape, electrical tape, foam tape, duct tape)
A good multimeter
Some heat shrink
A soldering iron
feeler gauges
Some assorted custom built tools to do irritating jobs like fork seal drivers etc.
And that should see you through pretty much everything, the only thing I'm thinking about getting that I don't have is a bearing puller... but I've got one of them at the workshop so I don't really need it, it just makes a few jobs easier.

That will set you back somewhere around about $5k or so if you get good deals on everything but buy good equipment, ie mitotoyo verniers/micrometers etc, if you buy crap you could probably get it for a bit cheaper, but you'd have crap tools.

On the other hand the minimum you can get away with is;
A 3/8ths socket set
A few loose 1/2 inch sockets and a breaker bar (you don't need a 1/2 inch rachet)
A screwdriver set
A couple of good pairs of pliers and some side cutters.
A multimeter
Feeler gauges

Thats about $500 or less if you buy good tools, if you buy shit, then you could probably get them all for under $200, but again, why buy shit?

Some nice to haves that would go with that minimal tool kit might be;
A combination spanner set
A small electric rattle gun

Thats probably another $500 worth of stuff again if you buy cordless, maybe $300 if you buy corded ;)

I'm sure I've left some things off all the lists, but thats what I can think of off the top of my head.
 

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pOint_01 said:
dont worry drew...he was talking about stabbing me with his penis...u wish matt...im not that easy!
lol I was just throwing a bit of a microtanty, because matt had posted in another thread about how we were wasting everybodies time and then didn't bother giving anyone any pointers in this thread :)

No problems though...
 

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I could be wrong, but I was advised it's better to buy decent expensive tools one by one, then get tool kits...?
(Although I think Kincrome has a lifetime warranty as do repco tools, providing they're not trade used)

Just missed the EOF Sales though.. I got some great stuff :)
 

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Top quality tools will last a lifetime even if for tradies.

If you're not a trady and using them for hours everyday it's like buying a ride on mower to trim the square foot of lawn under your mail box.

If you have 1/2 an eye for quality you can pick cheap tools that are not the bottom of the barrel but don't cost the earth too.
 

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BriZer said:
I could be wrong, but I was advised it's better to buy decent expensive tools one by one, then get tool kits...?
(Although I think Kincrome has a lifetime warranty as do repco tools, providing they're not trade used)

Just missed the EOF Sales though.. I got some great stuff :)
You'll get a better deal on a box of tools usually, but its worth making sure you actually -need- what you're buying, otherwise theres not a lot of point in having it.

Match, one of the things I've found with cheap tools is there are issues which you can't really pick without having used them, like, for instance, the flats opening up on an open ended spanner which makes it much easier to round off a bolt, or incorrect sizing on ring spanners.
 

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they r great...also come with lifetime warranty and are well priced! i think my set sells on special for a bit over $1000 but doesnt come with the torque wrench! :p
 
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