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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all

I managed to get the front sprocket to stop vibrating. Problem was that the rear wheel wasn't alinged properly. I went on the indicators and they where off. They indicated as alinged but they were out by 50mm on one side so I went off the pivet bolt and got it straight. Now the bike is almost running the way it should.

I'm getting a knocking sound and vibration from the clutch area (I think) and when I pull the clutch in the noise seems to go away. Or greatly reduce so I don't hear it over the exhaust. I dies it in neutral but gets louder and vibrates more as I ride. Clutch isn't slipping and all gears are changing fine, whether gearing up or down. I'm getting a knocking sound from the engine now as well and the exhaust doesn't sound right either. When I'm on the throttle is sounds fine but when I back off Its sounds Funny. Sounds like when your in high gear but low revs. Sounds like the exhaust is choking. Any suggestions? Maybe carbs??

Ohh and I've changed the oil and filter (did it today but made no difference). Used motul 10/40
 

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robbie said:
Problem was that the rear wheel wasn't alinged properly.
Winrar :headbang::blush:


I'm getting a knocking sound and vibration from the clutch area (I think)
Do you mean clutch or clutch lever? Make sure it's not just the clutch lever itself rattling.


When I'm on the throttle is sounds fine but when I back off Its sounds Funny.
Common cause of this is the chain. Give the chain and good clean and lube, if it still does it, you'll have to check for tight links in the chain (turn the rear wheel and see if the chain tightens and loosens as it turns).

Justin.
 

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Gee you're not having much luck with your bike are you.

Sometimes you can get a noise from the Clutch Bucket. They wear out a bit after time and aren't something that people normally replace until broken or damaged.

Justin had some good advice with the chain. But you might want to do a simple comp test on the engine.

There are also a series of tests to check carbies, valves and igntion are all working properly.
 

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it could also just be noise from the gearbox, with the clutch engaged you engage more of the drive train so there is likely to be some extra noise from the extra parts moving. mine vibrates more when the clutch is engaged too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
sir.b said:
robbie said:
Problem was that the rear wheel wasn't alinged properly.
Winrar :headbang::blush:

winrar?


I'm getting a knocking sound and vibration from the clutch area (I think)
Do you mean clutch or clutch lever? Make sure it's not just the clutch lever itself rattling.

It's definately not the lever. You can clearly hear it coming from below and you can feel the vibrations when sitting on the bike


When I'm on the throttle is sounds fine but when I back off Its sounds Funny.
Common cause of this is the chain. Give the chain and good clean and lube, if it still does it, you'll have to check for tight links in the chain (turn the rear wheel and see if the chain tightens and loosens as it turns).

I cleaned and lubed up the chain and sprockets on Saturday. The chain does have loose and tight spots so it does tighten up and loosen up as you spin the wheel. When I adjusted the chain tension I made sure I used the most loose part of the chain to measure and adjust from. No stiff or tight links though. Not that I could see

Justin.
[hr]
banana.logic said:
it could also just be noise from the gearbox, with the clutch engaged you engage more of the drive train so there is likely to be some extra noise from the extra parts moving. mine vibrates more when the clutch is engaged too.
I used to have it before and I know what you mean but it never used to vibrate and get louder when riding. If anything you couldn't hear it as much or feel the vibrations as much when riding. But now it gets louder and vibrates more on throttle. Does yours to that too?[hr]
ASTAR said:
Gee you're not having much luck with your bike are you.

Sometimes you can get a noise from the Clutch Bucket. They wear out a bit after time and aren't something that people normally replace until broken or damaged.

Justin had some good advice with the chain. But you might want to do a simple comp test on the engine.

There are also a series of tests to check carbies, valves and igntion are all working properly.
Your telling me! My mrs pointed out that all my problems started when I put a tyga fairing kit on it. She thinks it's cursed! I laughed at her at the time but now I'm considering it as a possibility..... I think she might be right. Don't tell her that though.

Bike ran like a dream before that. Is there a thread somewhere about how to do comp test on the engine? In new to this but I'm sure someone out there has asked this before. Maybe on the old forum? I don't know how to access it.....
 

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robbie said:
Winrar as in winner, I was bragging about telling you to check the wheel alignment when you reported the problem a little while back :p


When I adjusted the chain tension I made sure I used the most loose part of the chain to measure and adjust from. No stiff or tight links though. Not that I could see
I could be reading you wrong, but you need to adjust the chain when it's at its tightest, not loosest. If you've found the loosest point and then adjusted it, it's going to be way too fucking tight when it's at its tightest (= bad).

Did you mean to say there were tight links and then say there are no tight links in the same paragraph? If the chain tightness changes when you turn the wheel, then you've got stiff/tight links.

Adjust your chain again, set the tension when the chain is at its tightest, and see if any noises go away. I recommend replacing it, this is just testing.

Justin.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
sir.b said:
robbie said:
Winrar as in winner, I was bragging about telling you to check the wheel alignment when you reported the problem a little while back :p


When I adjusted the chain tension I made sure I used the most loose part of the chain to measure and adjust from. No stiff or tight links though. Not that I could see
I could be reading you wrong, but you need to adjust the chain when it's at its tightest, not loosest. If you've found the loosest point and then adjusted it, it's going to be way too fucking tight when it's at its tightest (= bad).

Did you mean to say there were tight links and then say there are no tight links in the same paragraph? If the chain tightness changes when you turn the wheel, then you've got stiff/tight links.

Adjust your chain again, set the tension when the chain is at its tightest, and see if any noises go away. I recommend replacing it, this is just testing.

Justin.
sorry what I meant to say was that the chain does have tight and loose spots but when I had it off the sprockets I had a close loom at the chain and the links bent in and out pretty well. There weren't any stiff or tight links that wouldn't swivel.

If I set the tension on the tight spots, won't that make the the loose spits too loose? I set it on the tight spot at first but when it got to the loose spot there was 3cm slack instead of 2.5.

But you might be right, if the chain is too tight on the tigh. Spot then the rear wheel takes all the bashing instead of the rear shock. So I've been told??? Could explain the vibrations and noise
 

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Yes, setting the tension to the tight spots WILL make it too loose when it's at the loose spots, but you're better off having your chain too loose than too tight.

The gap between sprockets expands when the shock compresses, yes, but I wouldn't be worried about my rear wheel taking a bashing from it, a snapped chain still hooked around a sprocket makes for a very very brutal whip (read: will destroy anything it hits, including you) would be my greatest worry, then I'd be worried for the shaft that the front sprocket bolts to, then lastly I'd be concerned about the chain stretching prematurely. Loose on the other hand, you only have to worry about the chain falling off (has to be way loose for that to happen) and faster wear because of the additional play.

Justin.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
sir.b said:
Yes, setting the tension to the tight spots WILL make it too loose when it's at the loose spots, but you're better off having your chain too loose than too tight.

The gap between sprockets expands when the shock compresses, yes, but I wouldn't be worried about my rear wheel taking a bashing from it, a snapped chain still hooked around a sprocket makes for a very very brutal whip (read: will destroy anything it hits, including you) would be my greatest worry, then I'd be worried for the shaft that the front sprocket bolts to, then lastly I'd be concerned about the chain stretching prematurely. Loose on the other hand, you only have to worry about the chain falling off (has to be way loose for that to happen) and faster wear because of the additional play.

Justin.
makes more sense. I'll set the tension again tomorrow on the tight spot and run it and see how it goes. Hopefully it will make a difference. I won't keep it that way for long. Might do a chain and sprocket upgrade soon.
 
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